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Posts Tagged ‘Elliot Sneider’

A Shakespearian Tragedy of the Heart

Sung by the members of Solis Camerata

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

Next week Solis Camerata performs our first concert of the spring semester. I’ve really enjoyed creating a Shakespeare program, but an intriguing manifestation occurred through the study of these texts.  It became more than just a program of choral music. Instead, a gripping and heartbreaking story developed. This classic ‘Shakespearean tragedy’ of lost love also features gorgeous choral music by both modern composers, and from the bard’s time.

(Read the descriptions under the pictures below to decipher the plot. Modern English translations included through a link on the title of each song).

ASU Choral Concert “Songs of Love”  February 26, 2012, 7:30 p.m. Valley Presbyterian Church 6947 E. McDonald Drive Paradise Valley, AZ
Tickets are sold at the door only. $5 for general admission and $2 for students with valid student ID.

“Ah Robin” round by William Cornish (d. 1523)

Twelfth Night 4.2
Soloists: Margaux Fox, Rebecca Woodbury, Mariana Barboza
The Fate of love. Some love is beautiful and lasting. Yet, be warned, some love is cruel and sorrowful.

Prologue: The Fate of love. Some love is beautiful and lasting. Yet, be warned, some love is cruel and sorrowful.

*Refrain: Ah, Robin, gentle Robin,

Tell me how thy leman doth and thou shalt know of mine 
Singer 1: My lady is unkind, perdie, Iwis, alack, why is she so?
She lov’th another better than me and yet she will say no.*
Singer 2: I cannot think such doubleness for I find women true:
My lady loveth me doubtless and will change for no new.*
Singer 1: Thou are happy while that doth last but I say as I find,
That women’s love is but a blast and turneth like the wind.* 

“Three Merry Men” – anon

Found in the John Playford Manuscript (ca. 1623 – 1686)
Twelfth Night 2.3
Soloists: Eric Chapman, Noah Brown, and Caleb Boyd
Three men roam in the forest, relaxing and enjoying life.

Three men roam in the forest, relaxing and enjoying life.

Three merry men, and three merry men
And three merry men be we.
I in the wood, and thou on the ground,
and Jack sleeps in the tree.

Romeo and Juliette 1.5

Spoken by Noah Brown
Suddenly one man spies a marvel… A beautiful woman! He calls out to her.

Suddenly one man spies a marvel… A beautiful woman! He calls out to her.

Did my heart love ’til now?
Forswear it, sight!
For I ne’er saw true beauty
’til this night!

“Where the Bee Sucks” Robert Johnson (ca. 1583-1633)

The Tempest 5.1
Soloist: Joyce Yin
Dancers: Noah Brown, Elizabeth Lee
The young lady flirts with this handsome young man and finds herself intrigued.

The young lady flirts with this handsome young man and finds herself intrigued.

Where the Bee sucks, there suck I,
In a Cowslip’s bell, I lie,
There I couch when Owls do cry,
On the Bat’s back I do fly, after Summer merrily.
Merrily, Merrily, shall I live now,
Under the blossom that hangs on the Bough.

“It Was a Lover and his Lass”  by Thomas Morley (ca. 1557-1602)

As You Like It 5.3
The happy couple fall in love and plan to marry.

The happy couple fall in love and plan to marry.

It was a lover and his lass
with a hey, and a ho and a hey nonny no.
That o’er the green corn fields did pass
In Spring time, the only pretty ring time.
When birds do sing Hey ring a ding a ding.
Sweet lovers love the spring. 
 
This carol they began that hour
with a hey, and a ho and a hey nonny no.
How that a life was but a flower
In Spring time, the only pretty ring time.
When birds do sing Hey ring a ding a ding.
Sweet lovers love the spring.

“Fancy Bred” by Elliot Sneider (b. 1977)

(Arizona State University DMA Composition TA)
The Merchant of Venice 3.2
Soloists: Sarah Moore, and J.D. Lawson
However, she doubts and questions her love for him:

However, she doubts and questions her love for him.

Tell me where is fancy bred?
How begot how nourished?
Or in the heart
Or in the head?
Reply
It is engendered in the eyes.
And fancy dies in the cradle where it lies
Let us all ring fancy’s knell
I’ll begin it. Ding Dong Bell

“Take, O Take Those Lips Away” by Emma Lou Diemer (b. 1927)

Measure by Measure 4.1
Pianist: Elliot Sneider
In remorse and sadness, he laments about the loss of her promised love, and the loss of her sweet kisses.

In remorse and sadness, he laments the loss of her promised love, and the loss of her sweet kisses.

Take, O Take those lips away
That so sweetly were forsworn
And those eyes, the break of day
Lights that do mislead the morn
But my kisses bring again,
Seals of love, but seal’d in vain.

“Farewell Dear Heart” by Robert Jones (ca. 1577 – 1617)

Twelfth Night 2.3
Soloists: Elizabeth Lee, Brina Gerstenberger, and Noah Brown
She asks a friend for advice, unsure if she desires to stay with him, or leave.

She asks a friend for advice, unsure if she desires to stay with him or leave.

 *Girl:  Farewell dear heart,
Since I must needs be gone,
*Friend: His eyes do show his days are almost done,
*Boy: But I will never die.
*Friend: Yet Sir Toby, there you lie.
*Girl: Shall I bid him go?
*Friend: What an if you do?
*Girl: Shall I bid him go, and spare not?
*Friend: O no, no, no ,no you dare not.


“O Mistress Mine” by Matthew Harris (b. 1956)

Twelfth Night 2.3
Soloist: Noah Brown
He spins a persuasive and heart-felt narrative, trying to convince her to stay and give their love a second chance.

He spins a persuasive and heart-felt narrative,
trying to convince her to stay and give their love a second chance.

O Mistress Mine where are you roaming?
O, stay and hear, your true love is coming,
That can sing both high and low.
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journeys end in lovers meeting
Every wise man’s son doth know.
What is love? Tis not herafter.
Present mirth hath present laughter,
What’s to come is still unsure.
In delay there lies no plenty,
Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty,
Youth’s a stuff will not endure.

“Loath to Depart” anon

Found in Ravenscroft’s Deuteromelia 1609
Soloists: Elizabeth Lee, Brina Gerstenberger, Rebecca Schmidt, Alexa Valencia
Nevertheless, she insists on parting despite her distaste of farewells.

Nevertheless, she insists on parting despite her distaste of farewells.

However, she justifies that their courtship was only a friendship that could not last.

She justifies that their courtship was only a friendship that could not last.

Sing with thy mouth,
Sing with thy heart,
Like faithful friends,
Sing loath to depart.
Though friends together
may not always remain
Yet loath to depart,
Sing Once again.

“Come Away Death” by Ralph Vaughn Williams (ca. 1872-1958)

From Twelfth Night 2.4

This tragic tale ends with his unrequited love.

This tragic tale ends with his unrequited love.

He mourns the loss of his love, equating it to death.

He mourns the loss of his sweet love, equating it to death.

Come away death
And in sad cypress let me be laid.
Fly away breath.
I am slain by a fair cruel maid.
My shroud of white,
stuck all with yew, o prepare it!
My part of death
no one so true did share it.
 
Not a flower sweet,
On my black coffin let there be strown
Not a friend great,
My poor corse, where my bones shall be thrown.
A thousand sighs to save, Lay me
O, where sad true lover never find my grave,
To weep there!

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